Home » Uncategorized » My To-Do List Today.

My To-Do List Today.

English: Abraham Lincoln, the sixteenth Presid...

English: Abraham Lincoln, the sixteenth President of the United States. Latviešu: Abrahams Linkolns, sešpadsmitais ASV prezidents. Српски / Srpski: Абрахам Линколн, шеснаести председник Сједињених Америчких Држава. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

  • vote
  • vote
  • vote
  • vote
  • vote
  • vote
  • vote
  • vote
  • vote
  • vote

No, I am not voting ten times–just once. Yet, for months now, I find my mind returning to one topic in particular–the Presidential election. Even though I am fortunate enough not to watch television, I am still inundated with mail from one candidate after another. (This is one of the few times that “other” mail outnumbers the bills and other junk mail.)  Anyway,  I, like most of us, have definite ideas about our candidate of choice and their respective fine points. I know that there is nothing that anyone could say or do that would change my mind or vote, and I am sure that the same can be said for most of you. Therefore, I have no wish to add to the histrionics of the day. No, I find another area concerning the elections more compelling — the voting level in this country.

As Abraham Lincoln noted in the Gettysburg address, the United States of America is “a government of the people, by the people and for the people.” With that said, our government is a vehicle of the people and without us the government cannot survive. We elect individuals to serve as our representative in both the federal government, and for the most part, the state government. The problem is that many do not chose his or her representative because they chose to abdicate this vital right.

Based on Federal Census data,

In the 2008 presidential election, 64 percent of voting-age citizens voted, an estimate not statistically different form the percent that turned out in 2004, but higher that the presidential elections of 2000 and 1996.

Overall, 131 million people voted in 2008, a turnout increase of about 5 million people since 2004. During this same 4-year period, the voting-age citizen population in the United States increased by roughly 9 million people.

In 2008, 71 percent of voting-age citizens were registered to vote, a decrease compared to the 72 percent who were registered in 2004. The 2008 election had a higher registration rate than the presidential election of 2000, but was not statistically different from the 1996 rate. Overall, 146 million people were registered to vote in 2008, an increase of approximately 4 million people since 2004.

Thus, 29% of those who were qualified to register to vote choose not to do so and more importantly, 36% of those registered and eligible to vote abdicated their responsibility.  People have varying reasons for either failing to register to vote, or having elected to register, and simply not voting. One oft-stated reason for not voting is that they are but one person and, as a result, their one vote does not count. None of us know the outcome of any race when we cast our vote, but we do so in order to exercise our vital, hard-fought right to do so. Even now, there are those who are fighting for their right to vote. Those of us who are already eligible to vote are a part of the governmental process, and by voting we join like-minded individuals to proclaim our choice of candidates. If you don’t vote, you are not a part of  all those who’ve chosen his or her representative to act as their voice in office. You’ve allowed others to make that important decision for you. Much like the Who’s in Dr. Seuss’ “Horton Hears A Who,” one vote, one voice, can make all thendifference. Just do it! Please vote.

Advertisements

Any thoughts? Please leave a reply.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s