The Choice

P question

P question (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This time last year, I had already chosen my word for 2015. In case you missed it, for a couple of years now, instead of the New Year’s resolution, I choose a word that I wish to work on in the new year. Last year’s word was “courage,” and I found that embracing the word as one that I wished to reinforce in my character. The choice of the word, though at times difficult to apply, allowed me to contemplate “courage” in challenging and difficult situations that presented itself.

In fact, I applied it many times in writing this blog. Sometimes, I will write a post that after doing so, I hesitate to post because I fear that it divulges too much about the “true” Lydia, not the masked one that I rely upon regularly. The post raises fears of being vulnerable and doubts about my actions. On those occasions, I asked myself, “What would I do if I were acting from a place of courage?” In almost every case, the answer becomes clear and I hit “publish.”

This year, it has been hard for me to choose a word for 2015. The choice is not merely a cursory affair. No, I tend to meditate on it, review the last year, and to simply listen to those whispers of my heart. Perhaps, it’s because this year has been a challenge from beginning to end, and there are simply more areas of my life that I feel a need to embrace on a deeper level. I have no doubt that the chosen word will soon present itself. There are 10 more days to choose.

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Making Peace With 2010

Peace, Victory, Two Fingers - from the origina...Image by \!/_PeacePlusOne via Flickr

As I woke this morning and looked out the window, the puddle of water on the top of our hot tub is evidence that it rained at some point during the night. The rain explains the nagging headache that has bothered me for days, since my migraines are largely attuned to barometric pressure changes. I can only pray that it is now at its peak.


Nevertheless, a migraine is not first and foremost on my mind. No, it is the end of 2010 that is a mere two days away, and I, along with many others in this country, around the world even, are in a race. A race to choose our intentions for the new year to come.  The choice is not taken lightly. Some agonize, and ruminate over the decision to the extent that an outsider looking in would swear that a life or death decision is surely being made.  In reality, what happens year after year is that we look upon this time as another opportunity to get it right; a way to ring out the old and ring in the new, but the fact remains that as Jon Kabat Zinn says “wherever you go, there you are.” A new year is a new beginning of sorts, but  in many instances, our life pre-2011, still haunts us.  How then do we reconcile with 2010 so as not to carry our old issues into the new year. 

Of course, there is no one answer to our dilemma. In perusing the web,  I found an article on the Huffington Post by Dr. Cara Baker. http://goo.gl/OHWwO. In the article, Resolving What Really Matters: 7 Practices For A Fresh New Year, Dr. Baker recognizes our quandary:
The truth is this: We simply do not know where we will be one year from now, much less tomorrow. This being the case, what do you want to make of today so that you feel great about yourself? I’m not talking about adding stress or taking on a mad-dash attitude! The last thing either of us needs is one more thing for the to-do list. No, I’m thinking more about what you’d like to drop from your life that would improve your sense of gratitude. For example, what “accounts” do you need to close in order to live freely? How could you do so simply? Dare I say it: how could you lower the bar to what’s been unrealistic? . . . . What if we were to revise our standards, giving ourselves more slack? 
She goes on to offer 7 practices  that allow us to make peace with 2010 and to go into the new year, and the new decade, with a sense of peace and purpose, as well as an idea of what may be important to us. They are listed below.
  1. Recall the gratitude you have for what others have given. 
  2. Recall the personal challenges that have helped you grow. Find compassion for the simple expressions of good that have come your way.  Tell those who’ve assisted your unfolding.
  3. Recall moments of beauty. Beauty comes out of chaos. (Share the memory with someone you love. Ask them theirs.
  4. Recall the new people, places and things you discovered that touched you most. ( Write a thank-you notes in three sentences or less, and send them.
  5. Recall the dreams that have continued to stir your heart, pressing your spirit to express them while you still can. Ask someone you love about their current dream, and share your own.
  6. Recall the unexpected moments of encouragement you’ve found in nature, in the stillness, or in a glance or look from another living creature that have reminded you that connection lives, and that life is richest when appreciating the simple things.
  7. Recall one favorite moment from this year that touched you deeply.  Thank whomever needs thanking. 
These practices apply as the year, and a decade, come to an end. There is no question that for many of us, 2010 has been a year of change, upheaval and turmoil. (When we factor in the preceding 10 years, it is mind boggling to think of the change, both good and not so good, that we have encountered!) It is little wonder that one would have the “don’t let the door hit you in the back” mentality towards this year. Dr. Baker offers us a way to view the positive aspects of the year, instead of focusing on the negative.  By doing so, we close out 2010 acknowledging its many challenges, but also making peace with it by remembering the joys and blessings that came our way.  I encourage you to read the article for yourself here http://goo.gl/OHWwO

Happy New Year, Happy New Century. 


Blessings, Peace & Joy  to you and your family, Lydia

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Merry Christmas, Peace and Joy, to you and your loveds. May you have a happy New Year filled with blessings, good fortune and good friends.


From my family to yours, Lydia